bloater, bloat

n
British
a fat or overweight person. A bloater is an edible fish, but the slang term is probably derived from 'bloated'.

Contemporary slang . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bloater — Bloat er ( [ e]r), n. [See {Bloat}, {Blote}.] The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half dried; called also {bloat herring}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bloat herring — Bloater Bloat er ( [ e]r), n. [See {Bloat}, {Blote}.] The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half dried; called also {bloat herring}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bloater — bloat•er [[t]ˈbloʊ tər[/t]] n. 1) a herring or mackerel cured by being salted and briefly smoked and dried 2) ich a freshwater cisco, Coregonus hoyi, found in the Great Lakes • Etymology: 1825–35; bloat (adj.) (see bloat) + er I …   From formal English to slang

  • bloat|ed — «BLOH tihd», adjective. 1. swollen and puffy: »the bloated face of a rubber doll. 2. Figurative. pampered; puffed up. 3. Figurative. inflated; too great: »…put an end to these bloated armaments (Benjamin Disraeli) …   Useful english dictionary

  • bloat herring — bloater (1) …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • bloater — bloat|er [ bloutər ] noun count an ocean fish that is eaten as food …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • bloater — bloat·er …   English syllables

  • bloat — /bloht/, v.t. 1. to expand or distend, as with air, water, etc.; cause to swell: Overeating bloated their bellies. 2. to puff up; make vain or conceited: The promotion has bloated his ego to an alarming degree. 3. to cure (fishes) as bloaters.… …   Universalium

  • bloat — [13] Bloat has a confused and uncertain history. It seems first to have appeared on the scene in the 13th century as an adjective, blout, meaning ‘soft, flabby’, a probable borrowing from Old Norse blautr ‘soft from being cooked 65 bluestocking… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • bloat — [13] Bloat has a confused and uncertain history. It seems first to have appeared on the scene in the 13th century as an adjective, blout, meaning ‘soft, flabby’, a probable borrowing from Old Norse blautr ‘soft from being cooked with liquid’.… …   Word origins

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